The Businesses That Profit From Your Move

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If you are a renter the statistics say that you’ll move once every two years. If you have a higher income or live in a studio you’re likely to move more often than that. If you have a lower income or a larger apartment you’ll probably stay longer. But on average with all renters figured into the situation the frequency is once every two years.

Moving is an expensive endeavor. Every time an apartment vacates there’s a whole bunch of businesses who have their hands out looking for a piece of that fat cash drop. Sometimes the tenants pay them, other times the landlords do. In a few situations it’s even the employers of the tenants or the government who foots the bill. Today I’ve got a list of the business types that come together to form the tenant-facing modern rental industry. Continue reading The Businesses That Profit From Your Move

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Kay Cleaves

Founder and owner of RentConfident. She's the primary developer of the website and research engine code. She's spent over 10 years working in the Chicago rental industry and has assisted with over 1200 leases.

What Does it Cost a Landlord to Replace You?

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Some unhappy renters treat moving out as a form of revenge against bad landlords. Others make the decision to move out a strictly personal one without factoring in the impact their actions might have on anyone else. I’ve often stated that turnover costs are the highest overhead expense for a landlord. Today we’re going to run the numbers to see exactly how much of an impact your choice to move out might have on your landlord’s bottom line. Continue reading What Does it Cost a Landlord to Replace You?

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Kay Cleaves

Founder and owner of RentConfident. She's the primary developer of the website and research engine code. She's spent over 10 years working in the Chicago rental industry and has assisted with over 1200 leases.

Would Pod or Capsule Housing Work in Chicago?

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This week my Twitter feed blew up with people talking about Podshare, a business offering what they call “co-living” arrangements in San Francisco and Los Angeles.

Co-living has been a thing for several years now, as has Podshare itself. The standard co-living M.O. is to offer furnished small sleeping rooms in shared suites within buildings that offer a networking opportunities, kitchens, laundry facilities, housekeeping and included utilities. The cost to rent one of these rooms is usually substantially below market rates for normal apartments, offered by the day or the month instead of by the year. They’re marketed to underpaid twenty and thirty-somethings in trendy neighborhoods.

Those of you who have been following the “Classified Housing” series in this blog know that housing with amenities of this nature have been around in Chicago for over a century. Those of you who were around in the 1960s or have been to liberal colleges know this sort of arrangement as a “co-op.”

The main difference between the controversial Podshare and other co-living arrangements is the sleeping quarters, where instead of a small room with a door you get a bunk bed in a room full of other bunk beds. Detractors complain that it’s socialism at work and glamorizing poverty. Advocates call it a corporate answer to oppressive housing costs where government and non-profit attempts to cure the problem have failed.

My question is, would Podshare work in Chicago? If not, would the similar Japanese style of capsule hotels work instead? Continue reading Would Pod or Capsule Housing Work in Chicago?

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Published by

Kay Cleaves

Founder and owner of RentConfident. She's the primary developer of the website and research engine code. She's spent over 10 years working in the Chicago rental industry and has assisted with over 1200 leases.

Classified History: Housing Ads in Chicago 1901-1933

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I’m back with another trawl through the Chicago Tribune archives, looking at classified ads placed for apartments throughout the city’s history. This is the third installment. I’ve previously covered the periods of 1849 – 1870 (Early Days) and 1871 – 1900 (Great Fire and World’s Fair #1). Today we’ll be looking at the era from 1901 to 1933, an era spanning two depressions, the Roaring Twenties, World War I and another World’s Fair. Since the majority of Chicago renters still moved on May 1 during this era I’ll be bouncing from April to April to find the newspaper issues that had the most ads to pick from.

This is the first era we’ve covered where many of the listed buildings may still be standing. The bulk of Chicago’s “vintage” apartment buildings were constructed during these three decades. Continue reading Classified History: Housing Ads in Chicago 1901-1933

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Published by

Kay Cleaves

Founder and owner of RentConfident. She's the primary developer of the website and research engine code. She's spent over 10 years working in the Chicago rental industry and has assisted with over 1200 leases.